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CD8 -

Peg Clancy Power

She Moved Through the Fair
Dilly No Douse
I Know Who Is Sick
An Leanbh Sidhe
Dilly No Douse
Down By the Glenside
Factory Girl, The
I Know My Love
I Know Who Is Sick
I Wish I Had the Shepherd's Lamb
Lord Gregory
Lowlands of Holland, The
Mrs. McGrath
My Boy Willie
Sean O Duiran Ghleanna
She Moved Through the Fair
Shule Agra
Tri-Coloured Ribbon, The

Another wonderful field recording obtained from Diane Hamilton. Peg is the sister of the well-known Clancy Brothers who discovered their fame and fortune in America while she stayed at home and raised her family, singing her old songs in the old way, without any show-business ambitions. Her singing is clear and sweet, as pure as an Irish stream.




PEG CLANCY POWER

Late this afternoon, I stopped in to see Peg Power and her family. For awhile, Peg and I sat by the fire and talked about songs and collecting. Then her husband, Tom, came in from his work in the tannery and the conversation turned to bullocks and wheat. After tea, while Tom and I continued talking, Peg started to get the children washed and off to bed, so they would be ready for Sunday Mass the next morning. Young Owen (age three), who looks very much like his mother with large, dark eyes, black hair, and a gay smile, was put up onto the table to have his hair cut. This required a great deal of tact and persuasion, as every time Peg touched Owen's neck with the cold scissors he giggled and squirmed. In the end, she warmed the scissors at the fire and told him stories to keep him quiet while she snipped a piece here and there. Next, Kevin (age ten) came bursting into the room, all aglow over the first hurling match which his team had won. All this time, Bobby (age eight) was cutting "forts" out of a karge sheet of brown paper. "Who's going to take the first bath?" Peg asked. In the end, they had "to toss" to decide which could "stay out 'til last."

Peg is a sister of the well known Clancy Brothers. She and her husband live with their three boys in Carrick-on-Suir, County Tipperary, Eire. The youngest in the Clancy family, Peg has a long tradition of singing grandmothers, mother, father, sisters and brothers behind and around her. Many of the songs she sings come from her family, while others were learned at school or from friends.

Slim and lively, Peg is also warm-hearted and full of understanding. She sings with great ease and no fuss. In fact, she is one of the easiest people I have ever recorded. Even though she is very critical of herself, she is always adaptable and cooperative. This flexibility, added to her traditional background, is strongly characteristic of her singing style. Although Peg is not a native speaker, she learned Irish in school and sings many songs in the Irish language.

Peg recently recorded for Connisseur Records, singing with her brother, Bobby, and is often heard on Radio Eireann. Last summer she sang with her brothers and Tommy Makem at the Edinburgh Festival in Scotland. As well known for her acting as for her singing, she has appeared in many Carrick-on-Suir Drama Club plays. In 1961, she won the Cork Drama Prize for the "best actress" of the year.

Diane Hamilton

NOTES ON THE SONGS

Side I, Band 1. SHE MOVED THROUGH THE FAIR

On the shores of Lough Neagh, in the Ballinderry district of County Antrim, they still sing an old song beginning with the words:

I'm in deep love with my love,
What will I do?
For the more that I loved her
The prouder she grew;
The more that I loved her
I found no relief
As she went thro' the fair
With her gear and her geese.

This old song has been largely re-written by Padraic Colum
(1884 ------), an Irish poet who has for many years been living
in America. He collaborated with the Irish musician, Herbert Hughes, who first published "She Moved Thro' the Fair" in Irish Country Songs (Boosey & Co.). This sophisticated version of the older County Antrim folk-song has been made popular throughout the English-speaking world by Sidney McEwan, tenor. It is sung here by Peg Clancy Power, because in her part of the world, the words written by Padraic Colum have superseded the original folk-song version. Those interested in Folk-poetry will recognize the touch of the "improver" in the lines:

And then she went homeward, with one star awake,
As the swan in the evening moves over the lake.


My young love said to me,
"My mother won't mind
And my father won't slight you
For your lack of kyne."
Then she went away from me
And this did she say:
"It will not be long, love,
Till our wedding day."

She stepped away from me;
She moved through the fair,
And fondly I watched her
Move here and move there.
And then she went homeward
With one star away,
As the swan in the evening
Moves over the lake.

Last night she came to me;
My dead love came in.
So softly she came
That her feet made no din.
She laid her hand on me
And this she did say:
"It will not be long, love,
Till our wedding day."

    
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